The Milam Residence in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.
Photo: Clare Berry/Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

Iconic Paul Rudolph House Hits the Market for $4.4 Million

Located in Ponte Vedra Beach, the seaside masterpiece features a classic Rudolph design

One of modernist architect Paul Rudolph’s most famous homes has hit the market for $4.4 million just outside of Jacksonville, Florida.

The Milam Residence, named for original owner Arthur W. Milam, has remained in the same family since it was completed in 1961, during Rudolph’s tenure as chairman of the Yale School of Architecture.

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Christened by Architectural Record as 1963’s House of the Year, the “cubist” dwelling anchors a two-acre oceanfront parcel in Ponte Vedra Beach and is equipped with a newly installed retaining wall along the shore for added protection. Architecturally, the most striking element is no doubt the distinctive rear façade, which features an unconventional concrete grid that reflects the multilayered interiors.

Aerial view of the property. Photo: Berry & Co. Real Estate

Arranged around a central pool court, the five-bedroom house, which is the only Rudolph-designed home in northeast Florida, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2016. Spread across 6,900 square feet, the interiors feature such original touches as hardwood and terrazzo floors. Plus, the architect also crafted the property’s chic one-bedroom guesthouse in a matching aesthetic.

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Rudolph, who passed away in 1996 after conjuring dozens of refined structures (including Manhattan’s Halston House), commented on the Milam Residence in a 1970 publication: “Gone are the earlier notions of organization through regular structure with subdivisions of space freely spaced. Spatial organization has taken the place of purely structural organization. Floors and walls are extended in elaborated forms toward the views, thereby making of the façade a reflection of the interior space. The brise-soleils also serve as mullions for the glass, turning the exterior wall into a series of deep openings filled only with glass. The exceptional wild Florida site 60 feet above the Atlantic Ocean is a counterfoil to the geometry of the structure.”

The front entrance. Photo: Berry & Co. Real Estate

The home is listed with Clare Berry of Berry & Co. Real Estate. 

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