Sweden’s Nationalmuseum is once again Stockholm’s premier cultural destination.
Photo: Hans Thorwid, Courtesy of the Nationalmuseum

Sweden’s Nationalmuseum Shows Off Spectacular $130 Million Renovation

The 1866 neo-Renaissance edifice was graciously reconfigured by architects Josefin Larsson, Gert Wingårdh, and Erik Wikerstål

Sweden’s Nationalmuseum, which showcases six centuries of Scandinavian art and design, is once again Stockholm’s premier cultural destination.

Closed in 2013 for a $130 million overhaul, the 1866 neo-Renaissance edifice was graciously reconfigured by architects Josefin Larsson, Gert Wingårdh, and Erik Wikerstål. “Now the museum is a flagship of inspiration and experiences,” says museum director Susanna Pettersson.

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Dozens of concealed windows have been unmasked, and skylights illuminate a new sculpture courtyard. Most notably, the institution tripled the number of objects it can display. Says Pettersson, “I value the possibility to bring the grand, and even magical, atmosphere back to the galleries.”

The Upper Stair Hall. Photo: Anna Danielsson, Courtesy of the Nationalmuseum
From the gallery for art from the 18th century. Photo: Anna Danielsson/Nationalmuseum
The Sculpture Courtyard. Photo: Anna Danielsson, Courtesy of the Nationalmuseum
The foyer with Carl Larsson’s frescoes. Photo: Bruno Ehrs, Courtesy of the Nationalmuseum
The gallery for art from 1800 to 1870. Photo: Bruno Ehrs, Courtesy of the Nationalmuseum

A version of this article first appeared in print in our 2018 Winter issue under the headline Grand Reopening. Subscribe to the magazine.

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